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Only for Wonks

September 19, 2014

A week of really interesting market action and a new Z.1 "flow of funds" report - all overshadowed by Alibaba.

The Bear's Lair: The best peace conference of all

September 15, 2014

The bicentenary of the Congress of Vienna, organized to settle the questions outstanding from the 22-year Napoleonic Wars, is a slightly uncertain date. The Congress itself opened officially on October 1, 1814, and the Final Act was signed on June 9, 1815. But on the other hand, the British Foreign Secretary Robert, Lord Castlereagh, arrived in Vienna on September 13, 1814, and the official bicentenary conference (in Vienna, naturally) opens September 17. So this seems as good a week as any to celebrate the conference that (because the 1919 Treaty of Versailles was a failure and there was no peace conference after World War II) was effectively the foundation of the global system we inhabit today. It established a number of principles of international governance, some of which we have kept and others that we would do well to re-apply."

King Dollar and the Peripheries

September 12, 2014

Things are turning interesting again.

The Bear's Lair: The death spiral of capitalism

September 8, 2014

No less than six sovereign borrowers are now paying negative nominal interest rates on their 2-year borrowing in euros. In other words, they are making money by going into debt. In real terms, medium-term U.S. TIPS and British index-linked gilts have had negative interest rates for several years. Contrary to the views of the happy Keynesians around us, this is very dangerous indeed. If negative interest rates were to persist, the world's stock of capital would eventually disappear. Without capital, we'd be back up the trees.

Do Whatever it Takes to Shock and Awe

September 5, 2014

Draghi beats "Wall Street" estimates.  Markets rejoice.

The Bear's Lair: Where's the growth going to come from?

September 1, 2014

"We wanted flying cars, and they gave us 140 characters," said venture capitalist Peter Thiel in 2011. He put his finger on a central dilemma of the New Economy: its innovations can make money (usually through redirecting advertising sales), but they add little or nothing to the overall stock of human knowledge or long-term happiness. Professor Robert Gordon postulated last year that we may have come to the end of the era of perpetual growth. His theory looked foolishly pessimistic, but as the current sluggish expansion limps on, it begins to look more plausible.


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